Norfolkans and area residents are reminded to consider attending Wednesday evening’s Republican gubernatorial debate in Norfolk.

More than 600 free tickets to the debate already have been handed out to interested individuals, ensuring a large attendance.

But there will be plenty of available seating in the 1,234-seat Johnny Carson Theatre, so all those interesting in attending are encouraged to do so.

The 90-minute debate is scheduled to begin at 7 p.m. Doors to the theater itself will open at 6:15 p.m.

Participating will be all six Republican gubernatorial candidates: Jon Bruning, Tom Carlson, Mike Foley, Beau McCoy, Pete Ricketts and Bryan Slone.

The debate is being sponsored by the Daily News and the Nebraska Republican Party, along with Norfolk High School. Some of the questions posed to the candidates will come from Norfolk High students, along with those posed by a panel of media representatives.

One of the unusual features of the debate will be the rebuttal round when each candidate will have the chance to respond directly to something he heard earlier in the debate and be able to pose a specific question to a fellow candidate.

A reception will take place in the Norfolk High cafeteria prior to the debate. It is being sponsored and organized by the Nebraska Republican Party.

For those unable to attend in person, the Daily News will be livestreaming the debate via its website at www.norfolkdailynews.com.

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