Crop report

Harvest continues in Nebraska, according to the weekly USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service crop report.

For the week ending on Oct. 13, there were 4.3 days suitable for fieldwork. Topsoil moisture supplies rated 1% very short, 7% short, 79% adequate and 13% surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies rated 1% very short, 6% short, 79% adequate and 14% surplus.

The following updates were reported:

— Corn mature was 85%, behind 95% last year and a five-year average of 92%. Harvested was 20%, behind 25% last year and 24% average. Corn condition rated 3% very poor, 6% poor, 20% fair, 51% good and 20% excellent.

— Soybean dropping leaves was 91%, behind 97% last year and 97% average. Harvested was 28%, behind 38% last year and 47% average. Soybean condition rated 2% very poor, 5% poor, 21% fair, 58% good and 14% excellent.

— Winter wheat planted was 95%, ahead of 89% last year and 92% average. Emerged was 66%, behind 73% last year and 75% average.

— Sorghum mature was 82%, behind 94% last year and 92% average. Harvested was 10%, behind 31% last year and 26% average. Sorghum condition rated 2% very poor, 2% poor, 14% fair, 66% good and 16% excellent.

In other news

This year’s spring and summer weather may have affected the feed value of your hay and you won’t know by how much unless you conduct a forage test.

LINCOLN — The post-harvest period is an excellent time to sample for soybean cyst nematodes (SCN), the most yield-limiting pest in soybeans. Soybean cyst nematodes often go undetected but cause more yield loss in Nebraska and across the U.S. than all other soybean diseases combined.

Harvest is approaching completion in Nebraska, according to the weekly USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service crop report.

With the wet weather this year, putting up quality hay and keeping it protected from the elements has been a challenge. While some weathering of bales is to be expected, those that were put up a bit wet, have been sitting in water or were otherwise saturated need some special considerations.

LINCOLN — Freezing temperatures are on their way for most of Nebraska. These freezing temperatures will play a key role in determining what can be grazed or hayed safely for your livestock.

The approximately 500-acre farm at Northeast Community College serves more than just the college community; it plays an important role in research and development for the agriculture industry.